BNIGuy's Blog

It's all about business!

Archive for the ‘events’ Category

Seek and you will find yourself

leave a comment »

“There are only 3 colors, 10 digits, and 7 notes; it’s what we do with them that’s important.” ~~ Jim Rohn

Over the next few weeks we will consider communication. Naturally, one of the best communication skills you can consider is the importance of listening. Since we covered that in detail in week 7 (Take Inventory) I am just going to recommend you review it again before continuing.

Asking interesting questions is a simple short cut to effective communication. There are a number of reasons tied to listening as well as a number that help you get your message across. Human beings exhibit reciprocity. This is a powerful social force requiring that we balance the scales. When you pass someone in the hallway try this experiment to see reciprocity in action. Nod to the first person. Odds are they will nod back. Say “hello” to the next and you will probably receive a “hello” back. To the next use a more unusual phrase such as “top of the morning.” The other person may be a little surprised by the greeting but will most likely use the same phrase back to you.

The best interviewers ask questions, listen to the responses, and ask follow-on questions that get deeper to the matter at hand.

How can you use this in networking situations?

There are three main benefits of asking questions:

  • This breaks the ice. Especially if you start out with questions about the environment. “I notice you are driving a new Volvo. How do you like it?” Even the shyest person could deal with this kind of non-threatening question. You are opening in an area of their interest.
  • These questions can be an excellent sort. Networking is a give-and-take arena and some people are only takers. Those that fail to reciprocate reveal themselves and you can move along early to invest in more productive introductions.
  • Once the first two bullet points are met you can simply ask the questions you want to answer. For example after they describe their market pause a moment. In most cases they will ask you about yours.

You can ask questions about their business, questions about them, and/or questions about things in general. Open-ended questions are better than multiple choice or yes/no queries as they elicit elaboration.

Business questions include:

  • Who is your target market?
  • What sets you apart from your competition?
  • What is your most popular product (or service?)
  • What is new in your business?

Personal questions include:

  • Why did you choose to go into your profession?
  • What do you like best about what you do?
  • What is your biggest challenge?

General questions include:

  • What do you do?
  • How long have you been in business?
  • Where are you located? Why there? If you could choose a perfect location, what would it be?
  • How do you generate most of your business?

Bob Burg, author of Endless Referrals has an excellent question he recommends you practice until the pacing is smooth. Ask the other person, “How can I know if the person I am talking to is a good prospect for you?” Be prepared with your own response, as well.

Your action this week is twofold. First, go back to week seven and review the traits of master networkers. This will prepare you for the process of taking your networking to a new level. Second, consider some answers you would like to share and craft questions you would like to answer. Go to your next networking event and try these questions out. Be prepared to listen carefully and help those you meet.

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.
All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

 

Written by bniguy

July 16, 2017 at 12:11 pm

The host with the most

leave a comment »

“The more credit you give away, the more will come back to you. The more you help others, the more they will want to help you.” ~~Brian Tracy

Last week we considered the benefits of sponsoring events. This week we look at the other side of that coin and consider hosting events.

I am not referring to simple get-togethers—although they are also important—but talking about events tied to a purpose or reason.

These fall into two large categories—singular events and regular events. Singular events happen once and are usually tied to a specific situation. These may be grand openings, award ceremonies, and so on. Although you may hold annual (or more frequent) award ceremonies this particular one is special and should be treated as such. There is usually a theme and purpose.

Regular events are usually more casual social networking designed around a recurring pattern. The theme is usually tied to food and drink or specific entertainment.

Consider a grand opening. This is a wonderful time to showcase a new location or new product line or some similar watershed event. Usually these are invitation only and align with the business. An example might be a new music shop. It is great to include musicians and this enhances the celebratory party-like atmosphere. Another example may be a clothing store which could showcase new fashions on the runway, too.

In these events, consider some of the benefits to the host. Start with the event itself and consider the purpose and how it aligns with your business goals. Who will be invited and how will that happen? Knowing that, who in my network would benefit from meeting these people? How can this event maximize those introductions? What kind of expenses can you anticipate? Who in my network is looking for a way to help me? What can I offer my sponsors?

Thoughtful preparation is the key to a successful event and some business people are very adept at making this event memorable and productive. Consider some of the people who would benefit from meeting the guests. They might be financial planners, estate planning attorneys, or bankers. A caterer may also benefit and welcome the chance to showcase their ability. A promotional items professional may engage a photographer in order to further their relationship. The possibilities are varied.

If you are hosting an event engage sponsors for signage, invitations, and so on. Commit to review the guest list with your sponsors and make personal introductions to the appropriate parties.

There is a lot of work involved in these singular events and attention to detail helps make them memorable.

One way to leverage the same effort is to host regular events. They can simply be based around a common interest—such as cheering for a team—or as simple as a midweek wine-tasting. Golf outings are an excellent venue. By carving out a regular recurring event you can build relationships and provide a forum for connecting people in a friendly way. In fact, this is an excellent way to deepen the roots of those significant relationships.

Your action this week is to consider some creative ways you can introduce your network to one another and celebrate an event by hosting a purposeful gathering.

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.
All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

Written by bniguy

July 9, 2017 at 4:13 am

Posted in events, HowTo, planning

Team up

leave a comment »

“If you support the community, they will support you.” ~~Jerry Greenfield

Promotion is a key component in expanding a company’s or organization’s reach. Sponsorship of local events is an accessible method to consider.

Let’s look at the bigger model. If you look at any NASCAR vehicle (or driver’s uniform, for that matter,) you can see that every inch sports a sponsor’s logo. An attorney I know started his business by sponsoring a local race team. Certainly, his objectives were to have the car go around the track and never get a dent. The driver was more interested in winning the race anyway possible. The lawyer knew, though, that some of these people would get speeding tickets on the way home and wanted them to call him immediately.

In fact, the sports world exemplifies big business sponsorship to the point that Super Bowl ads have become more important in many circles than the game itself.

This applies well at the local level, too. There are a number of benefits to consider in sponsoring events:

  • Promotion of your brand. This is enhanced when you line up your business with the proper demographic.

  • An opportunity to showcase your products and services.

  • A chance to meet and greet potential prospects and strategic alliances.

  • An occasion to deepen an alliance partner relationship.

  • A way to make a difference in your community.

On the other hand you must evaluate each sponsorship situation carefully. There are more opportunities than you could possibly support and more are being created all the time. Not every one of them is a fit. Here are some questions to consider first:

  • What is the target market for this event?

  • Do I get direct access to this audience?

  • How does this align with my networking goals?

  • What kind of exposure do I get for my investment?

  • Does it make sense to be there?

  • Can I get this exposure without this type of investment?

  • How does this enhance my credibility with the person I am helping?

  • Are there any competitors as other sponsors?

  • Are there any other alliance partners as sponsors?

  • Why should I do it?

  • Why should I not do this?

 

Action for this week is to consider those in your network that are holding events—a conference, an open house, a fund-raiser—that can use your support. In order to strengthen your relationship offer as much help as your business can provide and realize it may not all be financial.

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.
All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

 

Written by bniguy

July 2, 2017 at 6:55 am

Quick Study

leave a comment »

“Don’t leave inferences to be drawn when evidence can be presented.” ~~Richard Wright

If you are the father of a teenage daughter how long does it take you to size up her date?

Studies and personal experience puts this at about seven seconds. We give someone seven seconds to assess their intent, ability, and integrity. Obviously, the same time is afforded to us from the other side of the coin. That is, we have seven seconds to make a good first impression.

For those readers who cannot relate to the example above, consider some business models we are all familiar with where companies pay attention to that first seven seconds (or don’t) and how we use this experience to anticipate our results.

  • Your waiter appears at the table for the first time this evening.
  • You arrive at the front desk in your distant hotel.
  • You walk up to the service desk to drop off your car.
  • You finally reach the front of the line at the post office or DMV.
  • You present your health insurance card at the doctor’s office.

Your initial assessment may be right or wrong but we are quick to recognize corroborating evidence and slower to accept proof of our faulty judgment. If the counter guy is greasy, fails to make eye contact, and appears bored we expect our auto repair will be painful. The price quoted may be fair but we remain suspicious. The wait may be shorter than expected so we wonder if they were thorough. The repair technician and the company may be fantastic…yet we are harder to convince after that pathetic first impression.

How does this apply to master professional networkers like you and I?

I think the answer is obvious. We only have seven seconds to make a good first impression. That first impression sets the tone for the rest of our relationship and changing it is more difficult than supporting it.

With that in mind, let’s consider some high impact elements.

Your attitude is the single biggest toggle. Do you think that had a bearing on the scenarios presented above? Do you think it will have the same bearing on you? Be aware of your attitude and adjust it in the parking lot before you go in. Maybe traffic was terrible. Leave that in the car. Be prepared to smile, listen, and make some new friends. Don’t knock the competition or monopolize the conversation.

Your appearance is the next area and this is more complicated and often we want to justify our appearance rather than adjust it. This also engages each of our senses so be alert to all of them.

Dress appropriately…not for you but for the audience. You may be a fitness instructor and work regularly in sweats. While networking, though, you would have better success with clean khakis, a collared shirt, and dress shoes.

Here’s a controversial area, as well. You may have a beautiful body and enjoy showing it off. In some settings, this is entirely appropriate. In business, though, it can be a distraction or even a perceived threat.

Consider the sense of smell, too. I am glad I don’t smoke and am sympathetic with those that do not realize how the odor is repellant for many people. Heavy perfume carries the same effect and we all perceive these scents differently. When you first start wearing aftershave a small dab is all you need. Over time, though, you become immune to it and add more and more. Pretty soon the aroma announces your arrival before you enter the room. Even at lower levels some may like the fragrance while others perceive it as closer to bug spray.

It would be wonderful if everyone had open minds. On this planet, though, most do not. Your talent is missed when others cannot get past your appearance.

Body language is another key element which is mostly subconscious. A firm handshake, given while making eye contact, conveys confidence. Listen carefully and leave your position open to new people mingling. Stand tall rather than slouch or lean. Resist the urge to cross your arms or have your hands full of food and drink. I find the most successful strategy is to eat and drink at separate times, so you have one hand free. Practice chewing with your mouth closed.

In all of these areas, you are meeting new people. Educating them to have open minds is more work than you should invest and misses the point. Be a little friendlier, a little more conservative, and a little more cognizant of their first impression. Let your hair down after the event is over.

This week’s action item goes back to the buddy system. Bring a buddy to your next networking event and accept feedback in these key areas. Awareness is the start of improvement.

Also, take a look at yourself before going out and answer the question, “What do I think about this person before me? Would I want to meet them? Would I want to listen to what they have to say?” You will be able to answer that in seven seconds.

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

 

Written by bniguy

June 11, 2017 at 8:34 am

Posted in communication, events, HowTo

Breaking (and Making) Bread Together

leave a comment »

“Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler.” ~~Albert Einstein

One of the most valuable times in every networker’s week is meal time. This is a wonderful part of every day when we can relax with someone over food and really get deeper into a relationship or strategy. If you stop and think about how many meals we enjoy every year, the opportunity to maximize this is incredible.

Let’s look at the numbers.

We eat three meals a day every day for 365 days each year. That is more than 1,000. Let’s back that down to weekdays only (5 days per week and go with 50 weeks for simplicity’s sake) leaving 750. I recommend cutting that into thirds where one third is for your family, one third for yourself and non-business friends, and one-third for purposeful food encounters. Let’s simplify the math once more and convert 250 to 20 per month. That is basically one meal per working day. These can be breakfast, lunch, or dinner. I personally prefer one dinner per week and four breakfasts and lunches. That is, four dinners and sixteen others mixed. Some months it is twelve breakfasts and four lunches. Some months it is the reverse.

What is a purposeful food encounter? It is a planned event with just a few select people. They typically include 2-4 people and fall into one of these patterns: one-to-one, one-to-two, or two-to-two.

One-to-one sessions are level one gatherings with one other person to set strategy and further existing relationships. I find it most powerful to select a single target market or single aspect of your business offer and focus on just that. Talk about the problems your target prospects experience, what phrases or comments would indicate their experience with these issues, what solutions you can provide, what common objections they might have, and how to move the introduction along. You should also discuss strategic alliances, good and bad referrals, and the typical cycle you encounter in this arena. In the beginning of the process, this may be the only type of session you do and twenty or even forty of these purposeful meetings carry strong results. As well as setting the stage for the next level up.

Level two meetings are when the actual introductions are done. These are usually three or four people together and put either the strategic alliance partners together or the problem holders and problem solvers. This is to establish a new relationship by bridging the gap between these two parties using an existing relationship to introduce a new one.

Think of this as a triangle. Let’s set the stage. We have Matt Plastic who represents a credit card company that works very well with the restaurant industry. As you may recall we considered that in Week Three Find the Perfect Customer. Matt has a very good friend named Mary Shields, who is a Commercial Insurance Agent. Mary’s friend, Wolf Davis, runs a restaurant and is a client. Matt and Mary got together in an earlier meal meeting and Matt talked about how he helped restaurant owners. Mary looked through her client list and arranged a meeting with Wolf.

As you can see, this can become a very productive meal meeting. The parties that already know each other (Matt-Mary and Mary-Wolf) strengthen their relationships regardless of whether or not Matt-Wolf clicks or not.

Your action item this week is to start having these powerful meal sessions.

  • Look over your schedule and carve out twenty slots
  • Create a short list of potential partners
  • Rank by most valuable
  • Start inviting, start meeting

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.
All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

 

Written by bniguy

June 4, 2017 at 4:57 am

Make it so

leave a comment »

“The civil rights movement would experience many important victories, but Rosa Parks will always be remembered as its catalyst.” ~~Jim Costa

You have probably heard the expression about swimming out to your ship rather than simply waiting for it to arrive. This action-taking is catalytic.

How do you apply this concept in business? You can use catalyst events to foster introductions and establish relationships. These are especially useful for the more difficult introductions.

We have a National Hockey League team in town and they play more than three dozen home games. There are two Real Estate professionals that are fans and hold a few season tickets. They don’t sit together but are in the same general section. If one has a guest the other should meet they simply arrange to buy beer from the same kiosk at the end of the first period. What could be simpler?

You can do this with any activity you enjoy from golf to opera. I have a friend who teaches poker to small groups and this is a great way for the Mortgage Broker to meet more Realtors. It is also a good way for Realtors to meet more builders or for builders to meet more investors.

Bring people to something they would like to do and put them together with others they would like to meet. This is not a selling event or a training event or anything other than a social event. However, in this setting relationships have the opportunity to be established. That may or may not happen. If it doesn’t at least you enjoyed a good time and were able to thank someone important to you.

I have a Realtor friend that invites people over for frittatas every Easter Sunday. Over the past twenty-three years these have become signature events and many people look forward to this every spring.

This week’s action is to start the process in your life. Think of an event you enjoy, invite a few others, and start adding this to your occasional activities.

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.
All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

Written by bniguy

May 28, 2017 at 5:14 am

Life is Like a Box of Chocolates

leave a comment »

“Stranger, if you passing meet me and desire to speak to me, why should you not speak to me? And why should I not speak to you?” ~~Walt Whitman

Networking is all about fostering relationships, sharing resources, and improving someone else’s life. Based on that is there ever a time when networking is not appropriate? If you stay true to the spirit then the short answer is no. Certainly different situations demand different degrees but the opportunity to meet others and help them is always available.

Let’s consider the numbers.

If you attend an event each day and meet one new person that is 365 new people. On average, everyone knows 250 others on a first-name basis. That is more than 90,000 people. Powerful access.

It is unlikely you will connect solidly with all 365 so let’s consider one solid connection per month. 12 by the time the year is out. These people yield nearly 5,000 contacts.

I only point those numbers out to emphasize how much opportunity exists in meeting others. Therefore, you never have to “sell” to anyone of them. Rather, focus on helping them. If you meet thirty the first month, help five, and solidly connect with one everyone benefits. You never have to worry or wonder about who will be most helpful to you since it doesn’t matter. Help them. End of story.

Some of the people you meet are shy. Draw them out and introduce them to the people you know. Some are looking for contacts you might have. If it is appropriate, make the introduction. The more of this you do the more help you are able to be. What a wonderful combination!

The key, of course, is to be engaged and available at all times. Be willing to start conversation. Be willing to listen. Be willing to help. These three skills will carry you a long way. They are fun to develop and rewarding to experience.

Action Plan for this week.

Take another look at your calendar—starting with last week. How many events did you attend? How many contacts did you make? How much value were you able to add to each of them?

Now, take a look at next week. How many events are you scheduled for? Is this enough? Who is likely to attend? How can you help them?

This is a good time to create a follow-up system. Whatever system you use is best. Here is a simple three-column example:

  1. Event name – list each event. Include whatever detail cements this in your mind.
  2. Contacts made – list each new (and familiar) person you spoke with. Again, provide as much detail as needed to jog your memory, when required.
  3. Follow up – this is where the rubber meets the road and you deliver on your promises to help. If they need an introduction, log that here. If they will benefit from an article, remark on that here, as well.

In time this activity will become second-nature. It all starts now, though, so go out and make some new friends.

 

© 2017 by Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Stephen Hand of Triangle BNI.

 

Written by bniguy

May 21, 2017 at 7:38 am